Tag Archives: mind-body connection

Books for Yogis

I’ve created a list of books that I believe are interesting for people who practice Yoga or are interested in beginning their Yoga practice.

Katie’s Bookshelf: When: The Scientific Secrets of Perfect Timing by Daniel H. Pink

“When: The Scientific Secrets of Perfect Timing” by Daniel H. Pink explores timing to be most successful in life, careers, and education. He uses tons of research to show the optimal time to schedule a meeting, deliver news, take a test, and start a lifestyle change to name a few.

Detachment–both psychological and physical–is also critical. Staying focused on work during lunch, or even using one’s phone for social media, can intensify fatigue, according to multiple studies, but shifting one’s focus away from the office has the opposite effect.

In the first part of the book, Pink looks at our day; when we are most creative and productive, when(and how) to take a nap, and when to schedule meetings. The second part of the book looks at when to start a goal or lifestyle change and how the midpoints provide extra motivation. Lastly, the third section looks at the dynamics of group synching and what it does for belonging and achieving a goal.

Even though this book is heavily research based, I didn’t find it heavy or too clinical. It’s written for the everyday reader who has an interest in “life hacking.” It provides interesting ideas to try for more success.

Read this book if:

  • You are interested in how timing influences success
  • Want to life hack

Buy it Here

Pink, D. H. (2019). When: The scientific secrets of perfect timing. Edinburgh: Canongate.

Books for Personal Development

On this website, you will find a plethora of book reviews. These are all books I’ve read and provided my opinions and takeaways on. Below you will find books that I recommend if you are interested in learning more about yourself and growing.

Katie’s Bookshelf: What We Say Matters by Judith Hanson Lasater & Ike Lasater

“What We Say Matters” by Judith Hanson Lasater and Ike Lasater is based on Marshall Rosenberg’s techniques of “Non-Violent Communication.” Ike and Judith describe their practice of NVC as spiritual in nature as a way to connect to ourselves first and then to others. For them it’s a way to practice “Satya”(a Yama of Yoga Philosophy meaning truthfulness” and “Right Speech” from Buddhism.

“My words reflect my thoughts, my thoughts reflect my beliefs, and my beliefs, especially the unexamined ones, run my world.”

The basic concepts of NVC are: make observations, name your feelings, express your needs, and make a request. They do a good bit of work around connecting to yourself with empathy before responding as a way to be authentic with your needs, and wishes. The recommend using the phrase, “when I hear____, I feel____, because I need____; would you be willing to____? The book ends with a chapter on talking to our partners, children, parents, coworkers, and the world.

I have studied Yoga with Judith many times and have always admired the way she uses her words which inspired me to read this book. It’s a relatively short book but heavy with material. I feel as if I took in a lot of information and will need to read this several more times. I recently purchased Rosenberg’s book “Non-Violent Communication” as a way to dive deeper into this practice.

Read this book if:

  • You are interested in communicating more authentically
  • Have a desire to hear others more empathetically
  • Want improved relationships

Buy it Here

Lasater, J., & Lasater, I. (2009). What We Say Matters: Practicing Nonviolent Communication. Berkeley, CA: Rodmell Press.

Katie’s Bookshelf: The Tao of Pooh by Benjamin Hoff

Taoofpooh“The Tao of Pooh” by Benjamin Hoff is a cute little book exploring the principles of the philosophy of Taoism.  Hoff uses the characters, predominately Pooh to show how their traits and actions reflect Taoism.  Such as Pooh being the epitome of the “Uncarved Block,” when he has used his “inner nature,” and following the “Way” by not forcing or interfering and experiencing life as it happens.

“It means that Tao doesn’t force or interfere with things, but lets them work in their own way, to produce results naturally.  Then whatever needs to be done is done.”

Each chapter explores a different aspect of Taoism including a conversation with Pooh and a story or two to drive it home.  I have tried reading the “Tao Te Ching” that this book was based on and found it more difficult to understand, but it started to click more for me by reading this.  I was also interested in this book as oftentimes the characters of Winnie the Pooh are symbols of mental health diagnoses.  Overall, I think this is a cute and simple explanation of Taoism.

Read this book if:

  • You are interested in Taoism
  • Have read the “Tao Te Ching”
  • Love Winnie the Pooh

Buy it Here

Hoff, B. (1982). The Tao of Pooh. New York, NY: Penguin Books.