Tag Archives: children

Katie’s Bookshelf: The Little Prince by Antoine De Saint-Exupery

Littleprince“The Little Prince” by Antoine De Saint-Exupery is a sweet fable of a pilot who crashes in the desert and runs into a young boy who tells of his story of the asteroid where he lives and the other asteroids he has visited inhabited by a single adult.  Each asteroid that he visits he gets to know the adult and their ridiculous idiosyncrasies such as the King who demands obedience but has no subjects and the narcissist who so desperately wants to be admired.  The Prince tells of the Rose on his planet who he fell in love with but had to leave due to her vain.  While exploring Earth together, the pilot learns the lessons the child has to offer such as openness and curiosity.  Together they run into a fox who teaches an important lesson of relationships and love.  When the lessons are learned, the prince allows a snake he meets to bite him in order to return him to his asteroid to be with his rose.

“The most beautiful things in the world cannot be seen or touched, they are felt with the heart.”

This book is delightful in its simplicity but also a great reminder of how serious we take life and ourselves as adults.  We oftentimes miss the point entirely as we are wrapped up in ourselves and our roles.  We miss, forget, or take for granted the relationships we have established.  We are quick to judgment about others and are too focused on the mind and how we think.  We forget about our feelings.

This book will not take up much of your time but can be quite impactful.  It’s filled with illustrations on just about every page.  As a bonus, a movie version is available on Netflix here.  I was surprised that the movie version was not just about the story Saint-Exupery writes but an even sweeter relationship between the pilot and his young neighbor.

Read this book if:

  • You are in need of a reminder of the innocence, curiosity, and wisdom that children hold
  • In the mood for a endearing fable

Buy it Here

Saint-Exupéry, A. D. (2018). The Little Prince. NY, NY: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.

Restorative Yoga for Families

View More: http://cariannalynne.pass.us/katie-restorative-workshop***Restorative Yoga for Families is suspended currently***

Beginning February 1, 2018, Katie will offer 60-minute Restorative Yoga classes for parents and children/teens conveniently located near Park Road Shopping Center at Innergy Works.

This class focuses on relaxing the body and mind, enhancing attachment and connection, and developing healthy coping skills.  Inspired by Bessel Van Der Kolk’s book, “The Body Keeps the Score”, Katie has many years of experience with Restorative Yoga and integrating the mind and body for overall wellness.

More information on Restorative Yoga, integrating the mind and body, and using yoga to heal from trauma.

Contact for more information(katie@katieovercash.com) or to register.

Katie’s Bookshelf: The Whole-Brain Child by Daniel Siegel & Tina Payne Bryson

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The Whole-Brain Child by Daniel Siegel and Tina Payne Bryson is a book written for parents or anyone who may be around a child from the age of birth to 12.  Dr. Daniel Siegel is known in the psychology field by his research of the brain; integrating the different parts and using tools to develop it.  He uses a lot of mindfulness techniques.

The book is divided into 5 basic sections of brain education and tools to help your child with development of the various parts.  The 5 sections include; left and right brain, upstairs and downstairs brain, memories, mindsight(looking inward), and empathy and connection.

I found this book to be a quick but informative read.  I love the symbols they use to describe more complex functions of the brain.  For example: “As a result, kids are prone to getting “trapped downstairs,” without the use of their upstairs brain, which results in them flying off the handle, making poor decisions, and showing a general lack of empathy and self-understanding.”  The authors include comics of typical scenarios with responses as well as their suggested responses.  I think the tools in each chapter are valuable for parents.  The end of the book includes each section with how to implement the tools, divided up by age ranges.

Read this book if:

  • You are a parent of a child from 0-12 or work with children in this age range.
  • Want more brain development information.
  • Looking for better ways to communicate with your child.
  • Want more tools as a parent in handling the emotional ups and downs of your child.

Buy it here.

Siegel, D. J., & Bryson, T. P. (2011). The whole-brain child: 12 revolutionary strategies to nurture your child’s developing mind. New York: Delacorte Press.

Building Your Child’s Character & Self-Esteem

mommatters_315Self-esteem and self-worth development, character building, and competency recognition are journeys each child finds themselves on as they grow and mature.  Supporting children on this journey is vital and can be difficult at times.  Attending this discussion, you will be able to recognize each of your child’s uniqueness and gain or reinforce the tools to foster this development through adolescence as they reach their “enoughness.”

Katie is honored to present at Charlotte Parent’s Mom Matters Event on Friday, March 4th.  Tickets are now on sale for $20.  For more information or to purchase tickets visit their website here.

 

“Cool Down Basket”

DSC_0205I began to develop this idea 2 years ago after I received a basket full of Christmas goodies and had no foreseeable use for the basket.  So the “Cool Down Basket” was born!  As an Outpatient Therapist, I regularly meet with people who are anxious in my office and need something to take the edge off or children who benefit from practicing various coping mechanisms with me to use at home or school.  Parents come to me as well for assistance in helping their child with emotional regulation.  The “Cool Down Basket” is perfect, fun, and soothing for all ages!

Start off with a basket, box, or other container to put the items in.  Fill it with various “fiddle toys” that you can find at the dollar, party, cheesy touristy, or toy store.  I have found many items online at Trainer’s Warehouse or Amazon.  For those children who like to draw, include a piece of paper and some markers.  The “Calm Down Jar” is all over Pinterest.  For children, I suggest making it out of a plastic bottle and hot glue the top on to avoid colored glitter water from getting all over the place!  Making your own items or having your child create something for the basket keeps it personal.

Some staples for any basket include:

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A stress ball

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“Calm Down Jar”

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Tangle

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Pinwheel(to practice deep breaths)

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Random squishy things

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Something happy

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and who doesn’t love “Bug-Eye Bob?”

This idea can translate to a smaller version for the car or school.  Therapists can create a similar one for their office and what adult doesn’t like to have a fiddle toy or two on their desk for those stressful days??  Most of all, be creative, have fun, and “cool down!”