Tag Archives: parents

Restorative Yoga for Families

View More: http://cariannalynne.pass.us/katie-restorative-workshop***Restorative Yoga for Families is suspended currently***

Beginning February 1, 2018, Katie will offer 60-minute Restorative Yoga classes for parents and children/teens conveniently located near Park Road Shopping Center at Innergy Works.

This class focuses on relaxing the body and mind, enhancing attachment and connection, and developing healthy coping skills.  Inspired by Bessel Van Der Kolk’s book, “The Body Keeps the Score”, Katie has many years of experience with Restorative Yoga and integrating the mind and body for overall wellness.

More information on Restorative Yoga, integrating the mind and body, and using yoga to heal from trauma.

Contact for more information(katie@katieovercash.com) or to register.

Katie’s Bookshelf: It Didn’t Start with You by Mark Wolynn

IMG_2685It Didn’t Start With You: How Inherited Family Trauma Shapes Who We Are and How to End the Cycle is a book that explores this concept of epigenetics and how we may carry our ancestors stressors and traumas in our genes.  The book does a good job of explaining how this happens and provides some examples.  I thought some of the examples seemed a bit “out of this world” and unimaginable but interesting.  I think this phenomenon plays out more in the not so obvious ways the book provided.  When we start digging deeper in our family history, we are bound to find stressors that play out in our lives as they are our own.  The book uses “core language,” “core complaint,” “core sentence,” and “core trauma” development to help the reader discover their greatest fears and help possibly connect to an ancestor who had a similar experience.

“When entangled, you unconsciously carry the feelings, symptoms, behaviors, or hardships of an earlier member of your family system as if these were your own.”

Many chapters including the “core” ones have writing exercises to help with discovery and ways to process well as release our stressors and traumas.  I believe the writing exercises are beneficial and give the reader ways to work through what they have found.  The author goes into areas that are traumatic that we may overlook including in utero and early childhood attachment issues.

Overall, the book was intriguing for me personally as a therapist as it provides another avenue for self-discovery as well as understanding possible reasons why we struggle with what we struggle with.  I would suggest having the support of a mental health professional while diving into these topics.

Read this book if:

  • You are interested in epigenetics
  • Believe your ancestors may provide more insight into your own struggles
  • A mental health professional and want to help your clients dive deeper into their past

Buy it Here

Katie’s Bookshelf: The Whole-Brain Child by Daniel Siegel & Tina Payne Bryson

wholebrainchild

The Whole-Brain Child by Daniel Siegel and Tina Payne Bryson is a book written for parents or anyone who may be around a child from the age of birth to 12.  Dr. Daniel Siegel is known in the psychology field by his research of the brain; integrating the different parts and using tools to develop it.  He uses a lot of mindfulness techniques.

The book is divided into 5 basic sections of brain education and tools to help your child with development of the various parts.  The 5 sections include; left and right brain, upstairs and downstairs brain, memories, mindsight(looking inward), and empathy and connection.

I found this book to be a quick but informative read.  I love the symbols they use to describe more complex functions of the brain.  For example: “As a result, kids are prone to getting “trapped downstairs,” without the use of their upstairs brain, which results in them flying off the handle, making poor decisions, and showing a general lack of empathy and self-understanding.”  The authors include comics of typical scenarios with responses as well as their suggested responses.  I think the tools in each chapter are valuable for parents.  The end of the book includes each section with how to implement the tools, divided up by age ranges.

Read this book if:

  • You are a parent of a child from 0-12 or work with children in this age range.
  • Want more brain development information.
  • Looking for better ways to communicate with your child.
  • Want more tools as a parent in handling the emotional ups and downs of your child.

Buy it here.

Siegel, D. J., & Bryson, T. P. (2011). The whole-brain child: 12 revolutionary strategies to nurture your child’s developing mind. New York: Delacorte Press.

Building Your Child’s Character & Self-Esteem

mommatters_315Self-esteem and self-worth development, character building, and competency recognition are journeys each child finds themselves on as they grow and mature.  Supporting children on this journey is vital and can be difficult at times.  Attending this discussion, you will be able to recognize each of your child’s uniqueness and gain or reinforce the tools to foster this development through adolescence as they reach their “enoughness.”

Katie is honored to present at Charlotte Parent’s Mom Matters Event on Friday, March 4th.  Tickets are now on sale for $20.  For more information or to purchase tickets visit their website here.