Tag Archives: well-being

Katie’s Bookshelf: Go Wild by Richard Manning and John Ratey

Go wild“Go Wild; Eat Fat, Run Free, Be Social, and Follow Evolution’s Other Rules for Total Health and Well-Being” by Manning and Ratey uses the premise of going back to our “wild” nature to achieve more overall health.  They explore running and exercise, nutrition, sleep, nature, the brain, and our tribe as all areas to return to our roots.  They are not discouraging modern medicine or advancements, but do know there is some wisdom in our past as well as the absence of human conditions that have been on the rise in modern society.

Each chapter was divided by subject matter and provided scientific research, vignettes, as well as the author’s opinions.  Most of the chapters were accessible, easy to get through, and provided a new perspective on overall health and well-being.  Many of the suggestions were not earth shattering or new concepts to me.  It was appreciated to have these suggestions reinforced though.

The book ends with both of the author’s journeys on how they became passionate about returning to the wild and their own afflictions.  I don’t think it’s  a bad read and can help provide some useful information on better ways to conduct our lives.

Read this book if:

  • Interested in the overall approach to well-being

Buy it here.

Ratey, J. J., & Manning, R. (2014). Go wild: Eat fat, run free, be social, and follow evolutions other rules for total health and well-being. New York, NY: Little, Brown and Company.

Katie’s Bookshelf: The Alchemist by Paulo Coelho

Alchemist“The Alchemist” by Paulo Coelho is a short and sweet parable of a boy who sets out to find his “Personal Legend.”  He starts off as a sheep herder who is called to find treasure at the pyramids in Egypt.  He sets out on his journey and meets several different types of people along the way who all provide support and guidance for him discovering his Personal Legend.  The boy also runs into various conflicts along the way from thieves to war in the desert.  The boy learns throughout his adventures to listen to his heart, look for signs, trust the Universe, pursue his goals, and discover the treasure within.

“The Soul of the World is nourished by people’s happiness.  And also by unhappiness, envy, and jealousy.  To realize one’s Personal Legend is a person’s only real obligation.  All things are one.  And, when you want something, all the universe conspires in helping you to achieve it.”

I’ve listened to this book as well as read it.  It’s a great quote-able and inspiring novel.  I liked how simple and profound it was.  It’s also a quick read.  It was originally written in 1988 by a Brazilian author but did not gain much traction.  It took until the late 90s and some celebrities seen with it before it really exploded.  Paulo Coehlo was interviewed on Oprah’s Super Soul Sunday Podcast here and here.

Read this book if:

  • You are interested in an inspiring novel on achieving your dreams and finding purpose
  • You are a young adult setting off into the world

Buy it here.

Coelho, P. (2014). The Alchemist. London: HarperCollins.

Katie’s Bookshelf: Living Your Yoga by Judith Hanson Lasater

Living yoga“Living Your Yoga: Finding the Spiritual in Everyday Life” by Judith Hanson Lasater is the book for bringing Yoga off the mat with you.  Lasater has such a wealth of knowledge and wisdom on all things yoga.  She breaks each chapter down to principles of Yoga such as courage, fear, suffering, empathy, love, truth, and many more.  While she connects each principle to Patanjali’s Yoga Sutras, there are other spiritual associations as well.

Each chapter makes understanding the principle accessible, connects it to real life situations, and includes suggestions on how to practice it as well as mantras to accompany the practice.

“Perhaps it means that we are, in every moment, to remember the whole, to remember the gift of life, to remember the preciousness of every second.  When we do this remembering, something shifts inside us.  When we do this remembering, we talk differently, we act differently, and we treat self and others differently.”

What I like about this book, is that you can read it cover to cover, or pick a chapter that resonates with where you are.  Each chapter is something that should be taken in slowly.  I find myself reading the chapters multiple times.  Lasater says that the last chapter on “Worship”(only in 2nd edition) is the best passage she has ever written.

Do yourself a favor and pick up this book, I promise you won’t regret it.

Read this book if:

  • You are a Yogi and interested in how to carry the principles off the mat
  • You are interested in a more spiritual and compassionate life

Buy it Here

Lasater, J. H. (2015). Living your yoga: finding the spiritual in everyday life. Berkeley, CA: Rodmell Press.

Restorative Yoga for Families

View More: http://cariannalynne.pass.us/katie-restorative-workshopBeginning February 1, 2018, Katie will offer 60-minute Restorative Yoga classes for parents and children/teens conveniently located near Park Road Shopping Center at Innergy Works.

This class focuses on relaxing the body and mind, enhancing attachment and connection, and developing healthy coping skills.  Inspired by Bessel Van Der Kolk’s book, “The Body Keeps the Score”, Katie has many years of experience with Restorative Yoga and integrating the mind and body for overall wellness.

More information on Restorative Yoga, integrating the mind and body, and using yoga to heal from trauma.

Contact for more information(katie@katieovercash.com) or to register.  Cost is $15 per participant.  Some mats available at Innergy Works and all other props will be available.  Wear comfortable clothes.

Thursdays(Beginning February 1st) from 4:30 to 5:30 at Innergy Works(5200 Park Road Suite 127).  Ages 10+.

Register here.  Please book in advance as class is limited to 6 pairs.

Katie’s Bookshelf: It Didn’t Start with You by Mark Wolynn

IMG_2685It Didn’t Start With You: How Inherited Family Trauma Shapes Who We Are and How to End the Cycle is a book that explores this concept of epigenetics and how we may carry our ancestors stressors and traumas in our genes.  The book does a good job of explaining how this happens and provides some examples.  I thought some of the examples seemed a bit “out of this world” and unimaginable but interesting.  I think this phenomenon plays out more in the not so obvious ways the book provided.  When we start digging deeper in our family history, we are bound to find stressors that play out in our lives as they are our own.  The book uses “core language,” “core complaint,” “core sentence,” and “core trauma” development to help the reader discover their greatest fears and help possibly connect to an ancestor who had a similar experience.

“When entangled, you unconsciously carry the feelings, symptoms, behaviors, or hardships of an earlier member of your family system as if these were your own.”

Many chapters including the “core” ones have writing exercises to help with discovery and ways to process well as release our stressors and traumas.  I believe the writing exercises are beneficial and give the reader ways to work through what they have found.  The author goes into areas that are traumatic that we may overlook including in utero and early childhood attachment issues.

Overall, the book was intriguing for me personally as a therapist as it provides another avenue for self-discovery as well as understanding possible reasons why we struggle with what we struggle with.  I would suggest having the support of a mental health professional while diving into these topics.

Read this book if:

  • You are interested in epigenetics
  • Believe your ancestors may provide more insight into your own struggles
  • A mental health professional and want to help your clients dive deeper into their past

Buy it Here