Tag Archives: reading

Books for Personal Development

On this website, you will find a plethora of book reviews. These are all books I’ve read and provided my opinions and takeaways on. Below you will find books that I recommend if you are interested in learning more about yourself and growing.

Katie’s Bookshelf: Rising Strong by Brene Brown

Rising strong“Rising Strong: How the Ability to Reset Transforms the Way we Live, Love, Parent, and Lead” by Brene Brown is the third book in her sequence about overcoming adversity and coming out the other side even better than before.  Brown references “being in the arena” where we reckon(with our uncomfortable emotions), rumble(with the stories we create including shame), and rising from the fall braver and stronger that creates the new revolution that we live.

“The Rising Strong Process; The goal of the process is to rise from our falls, overcome our mistakes, and face hurt in a way that brings more wisdom and wholeheartedness into our lives.”

In Brene Brown fashion, she explores the falls we all experience in life(mistakes, death, loss, etc), and how vulnerability, shame, courage, failure, perfectionism, just to name a few, play into it.  She divides the book into chapters of what it takes to “Rise Strong.”  Each chapter includes a vignette or two(usually from her own experience), the reckoning, the rumble, and the revolution.

You cannot go wrong with anything that Brene Brown creates.  The topics are so relate-able and so is she.  You will find yourself identifying with her vignettes and even laughing through this exploration of difficult topics and experiences.  I especially liked her reference to the Pixar Movies formula for their storylines.

Read this book if:

  • You are human(because we all know we love her work and have all experienced fall)

Buy it Here 

Brown, B. (2017). Rising Strong. Random House US.

 

Katie’s Bookshelf: Go Wild by Richard Manning and John Ratey

Go wild“Go Wild; Eat Fat, Run Free, Be Social, and Follow Evolution’s Other Rules for Total Health and Well-Being” by Manning and Ratey uses the premise of going back to our “wild” nature to achieve more overall health.  They explore running and exercise, nutrition, sleep, nature, the brain, and our tribe as all areas to return to our roots.  They are not discouraging modern medicine or advancements, but do know there is some wisdom in our past as well as the absence of human conditions that have been on the rise in modern society.

Each chapter was divided by subject matter and provided scientific research, vignettes, as well as the author’s opinions.  Most of the chapters were accessible, easy to get through, and provided a new perspective on overall health and well-being.  Many of the suggestions were not earth shattering or new concepts to me.  It was appreciated to have these suggestions reinforced though.

The book ends with both of the author’s journeys on how they became passionate about returning to the wild and their own afflictions.  I don’t think it’s  a bad read and can help provide some useful information on better ways to conduct our lives.

Read this book if:

  • Interested in the overall approach to well-being

Buy it here.

Ratey, J. J., & Manning, R. (2014). Go wild: Eat fat, run free, be social, and follow evolutions other rules for total health and well-being. New York, NY: Little, Brown and Company.

Katie’s Bookshelf: The Gifts of Imperfection by Brene Brown

brenebrownletgo“The Gifts of Imperfection” by Brene Brown is one of her earlier works but such a “go to.”  It’s a book on letting go of our perceptions and “shoulds” of who we are supposed to be and cultivating who we are.  Much of Brown’s work focuses on shame, vulnerability, authenticity, and empathy.  One of her messages about dealing with the shame monster is to “share your shame with someone who has earned the right to hear it.”

The book starts off exploring Courage, Compassion, and Connection.  I think this ties in nicely with her common themes as we need courage to be vulnerable and share our shame, which breeds compassion, and drives connection.  The next section is on Love, Belonging, and Being Enough.  Sit with that for a minute.

“It’s as simple and complicated as this: If we want to fully experience love and belonging, we must believe that we are worthy of love and belonging.”

The remainder of the book is filled with 10 Guideposts of cultivating and letting go.  She has chapters on topics such as self-compassion, resiliency, creativity, and calm and stillness.  I just love the topics that she chooses and how she frames them as what we need to cultivate more of and what we need to let go of.  At the end of each chapter, she has a section called, “Dig Deep” where she provides suggestions on practicing what we are cultivating.

Overall, I loved this book!  It’s such a simple read and can be read at various times not necessarily succinctly.  Brene Brown’s work is so hot right now and she does an incredible job of making the material so relatable and easily digestible.  You cannot go wrong with any of her books!

Read this book if:

  • You are a human.

Buy it here

Brown, B. (2010). The Gifts of Imperfection. Center City, Minnesota: Hazelden.

Katie’s Bookshelf: Living Your Yoga by Judith Hanson Lasater

Living yoga“Living Your Yoga: Finding the Spiritual in Everyday Life” by Judith Hanson Lasater is the book for bringing Yoga off the mat with you.  Lasater has such a wealth of knowledge and wisdom on all things yoga.  She breaks each chapter down to principles of Yoga such as courage, fear, suffering, empathy, love, truth, and many more.  While she connects each principle to Patanjali’s Yoga Sutras, there are other spiritual associations as well.

Each chapter makes understanding the principle accessible, connects it to real life situations, and includes suggestions on how to practice it as well as mantras to accompany the practice.

“Perhaps it means that we are, in every moment, to remember the whole, to remember the gift of life, to remember the preciousness of every second.  When we do this remembering, something shifts inside us.  When we do this remembering, we talk differently, we act differently, and we treat self and others differently.”

What I like about this book, is that you can read it cover to cover, or pick a chapter that resonates with where you are.  Each chapter is something that should be taken in slowly.  I find myself reading the chapters multiple times.  Lasater says that the last chapter on “Worship”(only in 2nd edition) is the best passage she has ever written.

Do yourself a favor and pick up this book, I promise you won’t regret it.

Read this book if:

  • You are a Yogi and interested in how to carry the principles off the mat
  • You are interested in a more spiritual and compassionate life

Buy it Here

Lasater, J. H. (2015). Living your yoga: finding the spiritual in everyday life. Berkeley, CA: Rodmell Press.